If you weren’t able to join us in September 2017 for two days of outstanding presentations on relational thinking, you can watch 23 speakers here. Relational Thinking Week 2017 is one of a series of highly successful events run by the Relational Thinking Movement. We look forward to seeing you at the next one!


Relational Cities for Sustainable Development

Wednesday 13th of September 2017, Corpus Christi College

 Cities in the 21st century face challenges such as overcrowding, poverty, racial and ethnic tensions, air-quality, water availability and concentrations of wealth and poverty in different areas of the city. The focus in tackling these problems in the context of sustainability has been largely around the environmental dimension. However, arguably the Relational perspective provides a wider frame of reference for understanding and responding to these urban challenges. Relationships cut across all of these issues, and across all the different interests and communities which are at the front line of these challenges.

To tackle this complex mix of problems and challenges, civic leaders, service providers, planners and leaders of companies, schools and other organisations need a framework to enable them to build trust and facilitate cooperation between the stakeholders. Some of the pre-requisites to a successful relational approach to urban sustainability are the following:

  • Strong commitment to family and community;
  • An education system which develops relational skills;
  • Governance of business and public sector bodies which allow sufficient time for employees to fulfil family and community responsibilities;
  • Faith communities which foster positive value systems;
  • Political arrangements which engage communities.

This day conference will give those joining the Relational Thinking Week in Cambridge a chance to hear from others thinking about these questions and join the conversation about policies which can make cities more relational. The conference will also consider both how organisations within the city and the city as a whole can be assessed in terms of the strength of their relationships.

The conference will be chaired by Jyoti Banerjee, partner at Fronesys, an advisory service focused on the development of an Integrated framework for value creation in cities – where value is defined in the multi-capital context i.e. to include not only financial capital but human, intellectual, natural and social and relational capitals. He is particularly interested in how activity in one part or section of the city’s activities affects stakeholders in other parts of the city. His aim is to provide new insights and new directions for urban policy based on this integrated approach.


Thought leadership day: ‘the RELATIONAL agenda for transforming society’

Friday 15th of September 2017, St Catherine’s College

Government and business are rapidly evolving due to the social impact of information and communication technologies. The focus on historical data to predict future performance and risk factors, for example, are increasingly irrelevant as the pace of change accelerates. Time pressures on managers continue to increase due to access to information and communication possibilities, so that relationships within and between organisations ironically are coming under greater and greater pressure.

Relational Thinking is a social philosophy which seeks to understand better the nature and value of relationships, how relationships can be measured and how a relational focus can improve performance of companies, schools, public and private sector organisations and government itself. Relational Thinking also speaks to job creation, the Brexit decision, the future of Europe, international peacebuilding and global finance.

What changes if relationships become an end as well as just a means? Our thought leadership day will make it possible for participants to access this new framework of thinking and measurement, and the way it is being applied already across a wide range of sectors and organisations.

Below is the outline for the day. Participants will not be tied down to one track but will be able to go to sessions from both tracks. The sessions will be designed to be highly participative so that those joining us for the day have the opportunity to contribute their thoughts and reflections.


Is nationality made up?

According to Max Fisher and Amanda Taub, national identity isn’t all it seems. It’s the myth that built the modern world. But it is just a fabrication? What actually brings people together into these entities we call nations? Fisher and

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Losing the real Doctor Foster

The recent closure of her GP’s clinic, says Melanie Reid, brings a future of impersonal, rationalised healthcare to her village. Jennifer Foster had been in place for 20 years. For Melanie, who broke her back in a riding accident in

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Freeing minds

An excerpt from Tim Montgomerie’s assessment of the impact made by Michael Schluter, untiring advocate of an alternative to the materialism of Left and Right. The Jubilee Centre and its leader – Michal Schluter – offered something different. Something that

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How do we make cities work?

See the presentation by Michael Schluter CBE on Finance and Relationships Across Cities, from the 2017 Relational Thinking Week, held in Cambridge UK.

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Working with relationship algorithms

The inaugural Stakeholder Relationship Algorithm workshop by Consult Ren was held on 7th November 2017 in Singapore. This workshop is designed to help participants breakdown the complex algorithm of forming strong relationships into simple steps. Through hands-on activities and reflective

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