09 Apr

Hiring a new government

The_Houses_of_Parliament,_London_-_by Peter Trimming

CAMBRIDGE – With the election race now properly on its way, voters in the UK are asked to think again about who they want to be their leaders in the next 5 years. Robert Hall, one of the speakers at the upcoming Relational Thinking International Conference, writes in his latest article about how to rethink the process of hiring a country’s leader. Although he’s directly referring to the selection of America’s next president, his comments are applicable in a wider context.. He writes:

“Here is the rub: We get the leadership we select. If we want better leaders we must upgrade our selection criteria. Jim Collins, Good to Great, found that great organizations start with the question WHO? Who are the right leaders to navigate change? Interestingly, collaborative leadership, building strong teams and change of leadership are three of the top five competencies identified for future corporate leaders. Once you have the right WHO, those leaders work to answer the WHAT – direction, strategies, policies.

In recent years we have obsessed over the ideological beliefs of our candidates – the WHAT – with too little attention to their leadership skills. Talk radio, cable news, and blogs have bombarded us with partisan ideology, teaching us to exaggerate our differences. Those self-identifying as ideologically extreme has increased from 29 percent (1970s) to 49 percent today. Those with highly negative views of the opposition has doubled since 1994.  The elephant in the living room: polarization is ruling us and unless we change, the chasm will grow and the words rebellion, secession and civil disobedience will become acts.

We must choose. Do we support candidates who rigidly toe a narrow party line of WHAT issues where each side rallies their base and funds campaigns by demonizing the other side? The result: a President beholden to a narrow majority and a large belligerent minority committed to undo any change.”

So what does one look for in selecting countries’ leadership? Hall gives three criteria. Look for a “bridge-builder not a contempt-monger” he says. And “find a master of influence and transparency not authority and control”.

But he starts of by pointing out the quality of “a leader whose defining vision and animating purpose is to restore the relational bonds of this great nation”:

“I call it Relational Leadership and it values our collective marriage as Americans over any particular ideology. It means valuing a “good” solution broadly supported, over a narrow “pure” solution that feeds gridlock and division. At times, it requires embracing the opposition and rejecting loyal, moneyed supporters. It sees collaboration not as compromising one’s principles, but as the central leadership principle of diverse democracy.”(…)

First, hire a leader whose defining vision and animating purpose is to restore the relational bonds of this great nation. – See more at: http://disinfo.com/2015/03/help-wanted-now-hiring-leader-of-the-united-states/#sthash.sSGbImp2.dpuf

“Here’s the deal: democracy is a relational form of government. True Relational Leadership aspires to navigate this country to its unifying destiny not its leaders’ polarizing re-election. Hiring our next leader starts with selecting a WHO that will lead us together to WHAT.”

Read the full article here: Help Wanted, Now Hiring – Leader of the United States

Help Wanted, Now Hiring – Leader of the United States – See more at: http://disinfo.com/2015/03/help-wanted-now-hiring-leader-of-the-united-states/#sthash.gI64Jsbo.dpuf

Photo: Peter Trimming

Here is the rub: We get the leadership we select. If we want better leaders we must upgrade our selection criteria. Jim Collins, Good to Great, found that great organizations start with the question WHO? Who are the right leaders to navigate change? Interestingly, collaborative leadership, building strong teams and change of leadership are three of the top five competencies identified for future corporate leaders. Once you have the right WHO, those leaders work to answer the WHAT – direction, strategies, policies.

In recent years we have obsessed over the ideological beliefs of our candidates – the WHAT – with too little attention to their leadership skills. Talk radio, cable news, and blogs have bombarded us with partisan ideology, teaching us to exaggerate our differences. Those self-identifying as ideologically extreme has increased from 29 percent (1970s) to 49 percent today. Those with highly negative views of the opposition has doubled since 1994.  The elephant in the living room: polarization is ruling us and unless we change, the chasm will grow and the words rebellion, secession and civil disobedience will become acts.

We must choose. Do we support candidates who rigidly toe a narrow party line of WHAT issues where each side rallies their base and funds campaigns by demonizing the other side? The result: a President beholden to a narrow majority and a large belligerent minority committed to undo any change.

– See more at: http://disinfo.com/2015/03/help-wanted-now-hiring-leader-of-the-united-states/#sthash.sSGbImp2.dpuf

Here is the rub: We get the leadership we select. If we want better leaders we must upgrade our selection criteria. Jim Collins, Good to Great, found that great organizations start with the question WHO? Who are the right leaders to navigate change? Interestingly, collaborative leadership, building strong teams and change of leadership are three of the top five competencies identified for future corporate leaders. Once you have the right WHO, those leaders work to answer the WHAT – direction, strategies, policies.

In recent years we have obsessed over the ideological beliefs of our candidates – the WHAT – with too little attention to their leadership skills. Talk radio, cable news, and blogs have bombarded us with partisan ideology, teaching us to exaggerate our differences. Those self-identifying as ideologically extreme has increased from 29 percent (1970s) to 49 percent today. Those with highly negative views of the opposition has doubled since 1994.  The elephant in the living room: polarization is ruling us and unless we change, the chasm will grow and the words rebellion, secession and civil disobedience will become acts.

We must choose. Do we support candidates who rigidly toe a narrow party line of WHAT issues where each side rallies their base and funds campaigns by demonizing the other side? The result: a President beholden to a narrow majority and a large belligerent minority committed to undo any change.

– See more at: http://disinfo.com/2015/03/help-wanted-now-hiring-leader-of-the-united-states/#sthash.sSGbImp2.dpuf

Here is the rub: We get the leadership we select. If we want better leaders we must upgrade our selection criteria. Jim Collins, Good to Great, found that great organizations start with the question WHO? Who are the right leaders to navigate change? Interestingly, collaborative leadership, building strong teams and change of leadership are three of the top five competencies identified for future corporate leaders. Once you have the right WHO, those leaders work to answer the WHAT – direction, strategies, policies.

In recent years we have obsessed over the ideological beliefs of our candidates – the WHAT – with too little attention to their leadership skills. Talk radio, cable news, and blogs have bombarded us with partisan ideology, teaching us to exaggerate our differences. Those self-identifying as ideologically extreme has increased from 29 percent (1970s) to 49 percent today. Those with highly negative views of the opposition has doubled since 1994.  The elephant in the living room: polarization is ruling us and unless we change, the chasm will grow and the words rebellion, secession and civil disobedience will become acts.

We must choose. Do we support candidates who rigidly toe a narrow party line of WHAT issues where each side rallies their base and funds campaigns by demonizing the other side? The result: a President beholden to a narrow majority and a large belligerent minority committed to undo any change.

– See more at: http://disinfo.com/2015/03/help-wanted-now-hiring-leader-of-the-united-states/#sthash.sSGbImp2.dpuf

Here is the rub: We get the leadership we select. If we want better leaders we must upgrade our selection criteria. Jim Collins, Good to Great, found that great organizations start with the question WHO? Who are the right leaders to navigate change? Interestingly, collaborative leadership, building strong teams and change of leadership are three of the top five competencies identified for future corporate leaders. Once you have the right WHO, those leaders work to answer the WHAT – direction, strategies, policies.

In recent years we have obsessed over the ideological beliefs of our candidates – the WHAT – with too little attention to their leadership skills. Talk radio, cable news, and blogs have bombarded us with partisan ideology, teaching us to exaggerate our differences. Those self-identifying as ideologically extreme has increased from 29 percent (1970s) to 49 percent today. Those with highly negative views of the opposition has doubled since 1994.  The elephant in the living room: polarization is ruling us and unless we change, the chasm will grow and the words rebellion, secession and civil disobedience will become acts.

We must choose. Do we support candidates who rigidly toe a narrow party line of WHAT issues where each side rallies their base and funds campaigns by demonizing the other side? The result: a President beholden to a narrow majority and a large belligerent minority committed to undo any change.

– See more at: http://disinfo.com/2015/03/help-wanted-now-hiring-leader-of-the-united-states/#sthash.sSGbImp2.dpuf

Here is the rub: We get the leadership we select. If we want better leaders we must upgrade our selection criteria. Jim Collins, Good to Great, found that great organizations start with the question WHO? Who are the right leaders to navigate change? Interestingly, collaborative leadership, building strong teams and change of leadership are three of the top five competencies identified for future corporate leaders. Once you have the right WHO, those leaders work to answer the WHAT – direction, strategies, policies.

In recent years we have obsessed over the ideological beliefs of our candidates – the WHAT – with too little attention to their leadership skills. Talk radio, cable news, and blogs have bombarded us with partisan ideology, teaching us to exaggerate our differences. Those self-identifying as ideologically extreme has increased from 29 percent (1970s) to 49 percent today. Those with highly negative views of the opposition has doubled since 1994.  The elephant in the living room: polarization is ruling us and unless we change, the chasm will grow and the words rebellion, secession and civil disobedience will become acts.

We must choose. Do we support candidates who rigidly toe a narrow party line of WHAT issues where each side rallies their base and funds campaigns by demonizing the other side? The result: a President beholden to a narrow majority and a large belligerent minority committed to undo any change.

– See more at: http://disinfo.com/2015/03/help-wanted-now-hiring-leader-of-the-united-states/#sthash.sSGbImp2.dpuf

Here is the rub: We get the leadership we select. If we want better leaders we must upgrade our selection criteria. Jim Collins, Good to Great, found that great organizations start with the question WHO? Who are the right leaders to navigate change? Interestingly, collaborative leadership, building strong teams and change of leadership are three of the top five competencies identified for future corporate leaders. Once you have the right WHO, those leaders work to answer the WHAT – direction, strategies, policies.

In recent years we have obsessed over the ideological beliefs of our candidates – the WHAT – with too little attention to their leadership skills. Talk radio, cable news, and blogs have bombarded us with partisan ideology, teaching us to exaggerate our differences. Those self-identifying as ideologically extreme has increased from 29 percent (1970s) to 49 percent today. Those with highly negative views of the opposition has doubled since 1994.  The elephant in the living room: polarization is ruling us and unless we change, the chasm will grow and the words rebellion, secession and civil disobedience will become acts.

We must choose. Do we support candidates who rigidly toe a narrow party line of WHAT issues where each side rallies their base and funds campaigns by demonizing the other side? The result: a President beholden to a narrow majority and a large belligerent minority committed to undo any change.

– See more at: http://disinfo.com/2015/03/help-wanted-now-hiring-leader-of-the-united-states/#sthash.sSGbImp2.dpuf

Here is the rub: We get the leadership we select. If we want better leaders we must upgrade our selection criteria. Jim Collins, Good to Great, found that great organizations start with the question WHO? Who are the right leaders to navigate change? Interestingly, collaborative leadership, building strong teams and change of leadership are three of the top five competencies identified for future corporate leaders. Once you have the right WHO, those leaders work to answer the WHAT – direction, strategies, policies.

In recent years we have obsessed over the ideological beliefs of our candidates – the WHAT – with too little attention to their leadership skills. Talk radio, cable news, and blogs have bombarded us with partisan ideology, teaching us to exaggerate our differences. Those self-identifying as ideologically extreme has increased from 29 percent (1970s) to 49 percent today. Those with highly negative views of the opposition has doubled since 1994.  The elephant in the living room: polarization is ruling us and unless we change, the chasm will grow and the words rebellion, secession and civil disobedience will become acts.

We must choose. Do we support candidates who rigidly toe a narrow party line of WHAT issues where each side rallies their base and funds campaigns by demonizing the other side? The result: a President beholden to a narrow majority and a large belligerent minority committed to undo any change.

– See more at: http://disinfo.com/2015/03/help-wanted-now-hiring-leader-of-the-united-states/#sthash.sSGbImp2.dpuf

Here is the rub: We get the leadership we select. If we want better leaders we must upgrade our selection criteria. Jim Collins, Good to Great, found that great organizations start with the question WHO? Who are the right leaders to navigate change? Interestingly, collaborative leadership, building strong teams and change of leadership are three of the top five competencies identified for future corporate leaders. Once you have the right WHO, those leaders work to answer the WHAT – direction, strategies, policies.

In recent years we have obsessed over the ideological beliefs of our candidates – the WHAT – with too little attention to their leadership skills. Talk radio, cable news, and blogs have bombarded us with partisan ideology, teaching us to exaggerate our differences. Those self-identifying as ideologically extreme has increased from 29 percent (1970s) to 49 percent today. Those with highly negative views of the opposition has doubled since 1994.  The elephant in the living room: polarization is ruling us and unless we change, the chasm will grow and the words rebellion, secession and civil disobedience will become acts.

We must choose. Do we support candidates who rigidly toe a narrow party line of WHAT issues where each side rallies their base and funds campaigns by demonizing the other side? The result: a President beholden to a narrow majority and a large belligerent minority committed to undo any change.

– See more at: http://disinfo.com/2015/03/help-wanted-now-hiring-leader-of-the-united-states/#sthash.sSGbImp2.dpuf

Here is the rub: We get the leadership we select. If we want better leaders we must upgrade our selection criteria. Jim Collins, Good to Great, found that great organizations start with the question WHO? Who are the right leaders to navigate change? Interestingly, collaborative leadership, building strong teams and change of leadership are three of the top five competencies identified for future corporate leaders. Once you have the right WHO, those leaders work to answer the WHAT – direction, strategies, policies.

In recent years we have obsessed over the ideological beliefs of our candidates – the WHAT – with too little attention to their leadership skills. Talk radio, cable news, and blogs have bombarded us with partisan ideology, teaching us to exaggerate our differences. Those self-identifying as ideologically extreme has increased from 29 percent (1970s) to 49 percent today. Those with highly negative views of the opposition has doubled since 1994.  The elephant in the living room: polarization is ruling us and unless we change, the chasm will grow and the words rebellion, secession and civil disobedience will become acts.

We must choose. Do we support candidates who rigidly toe a narrow party line of WHAT issues where each side rallies their base and funds campaigns by demonizing the other side? The result: a President beholden to a narrow majority and a large belligerent minority committed to undo any change.

– See more at: http://disinfo.com/2015/03/help-wanted-now-hiring-leader-of-the-united-states/#sthash.sSGbImp2.dpuf